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Legacy


    The Legacy Pathway focuses on the Workshop model of instruction with an emphasis on the use of quality tools. Workshop model classrooms are designed with four basic parts: opening, mini-lesson, work time, and debriefing. Both the Legacy and Fusion pathway offer students an equal opportunity to prepare for the rigor of high school, as well as take the same electives and high school credit classes.


Course Descriptions:

7th Grade Reading Workshop:

Reading Workshop is modeled after the Literacy Collaborative framework.   Literacy lessons consist of a number of elements that provide many opportunities for reading and writing across the curriculum. Instruction moves from demonstration and explicit teaching, to guided practice, to independent problem solving. Students understand comparisons, such as analogies and metaphors, and they begin to use their knowledge of roots and word parts to understand science, social studies, and mathematics vocabulary. They begin to read reviews, as well as critiques of both informational and literary writing. Students read and respond to fiction selections, such as classic and contemporary literature, historical fiction, fantasy or science fiction, mystery or adventure, folklore or mythology, poetry, short stories, and dramas, and nonfiction selections, such as subject area books, biographies or autobiographies, magazines and newspapers, various reference or technical materials, and online information. Students self-select books of interest and read independently for enjoyment.

 

7th Grade Social Studies Workshop

Social Studies workshop is designed with four basic parts: opening, mini-lesson, work time, and debriefing.  Students compare the history, geography, government, economic systems, current issues, and cultures of the Western World with an emphasis on: (1) Asia, (2) Africa, (3) the Commonwealth of Independent States, (4) the Middle East, (5) the Pacific Islands, (6) Australia, and (7) New Zealand. Learning experiences should help them to make the transition from concrete examples to abstract ideas, concepts, and generalizations. In-depth studies provide greater understanding of environmental influences on economic, cultural, and political institutions. Opportunities to develop thinking and research skills include reading and interpreting maps, graphs, and charts. Decision-making and problem-solving activities include the following: (1) identifying problems, issues and questions; (2) information gathering; (3) hypothesizing; and (4) evaluating alternative solutions and actions.

The days learning targets are shared in the opening to set the stage for learning.  During the mini lesson, the teacher provides direct instruction to the whole class.  Work time is designed to allow the students to practice the learning.  The teacher confers with individual and small groups at this time to differentiate learning to ensure one years growth for each student.


7th Grade Science Workshop

Science workshop is designed with four basic parts: opening, mini-lesson, work time, and debriefing. Students understand that energy cannot be created or destroyed, but only changed from one form into another or transferred from place to place. They understand forces as they apply to nature and machines. They describe how earth processes have shaped the topography of the earth and have made it possible to measure geological time. Students understand the cellular structure of living organisms, from single celled to multicellular.

The days learning targets are shared in the opening to set the stage for learning.  During the mini lesson, the teacher provides direct instruction to the whole class.  Work time is designed to allow the students to practice the learning.  The teacher confers with individual and small groups at this time to differentiate learning to ensure one year’s growth for each student.

 

7th Grade Math Workshop

Math Workshop is designed with four basic parts: opening, mini-lesson, work time, and debriefing.  Students extend ratio reasoning to analyze proportional relationships and solve real-world and mathematical problems.  Application of properties of operations in the context of algebraic expressions and equations; draw, construct, describe, and analyze geometrical figures and the relationships between them; apply understandings of statistical variability and distributions by using random sampling, making inferences, and investigating chance processes and probability models.

The days learning targets are shared in the opening to set the stage for learning.  During the mini lesson, the teacher provides direct instruction to the whole class.  Work time is designed to allow the students to practice the learning.  The teacher confers with individual and small groups at this time to differentiate learning to ensure one or more years growth for each student.


8th Grade Reading Workshop:

Reading Workshop is modeled after the Literacy Collaborative framework.   Literacy lessons consist of a number of elements that provide many opportunities for reading and writing across the curriculum. Instruction moves from demonstration and explicit teaching, to guided practice, to independent problem solving. Students begin to study the history and development of English vocabulary. They begin to compare different types of writing as well as different perspectives on similar topics or themes. They evaluate the logic of informational texts and analyze how literature reflects the backgrounds, attitudes, and beliefs of the authors. They read and respond to fiction selections, such as classic and contemporary literature, historical fiction, fantasy or science fiction, mystery or adventure, folklore or mythology, poetry, short stories, and dramas, and nonfiction selections, such as subject area books, biographies or autobiographies, magazines and newspapers, various reference or technical materials, and online information. Students self-select books of interest and read independently for enjoyment.

 

8th Grade Social Studies Workshop

Social Studies workshop is designed with four basic parts: opening, mini-lesson, work time, and debriefing.  United States History emphasizes the interaction of historical events and geographic, social, and economic influences on national development prior to the twentieth century. Special attention is given to (1) Native American cultures and the pre-Columbian period; (2) colonial, revolutionary, and constitutional issues; (3) early national formation; (4) sectional divisions leading to the Civil War; (5) Reconstruction; (6) industrialization; (7) urbanization; and (8) immigration. Students examine major themes, issues, events, movements, and figures in United States history prior to 1900 and explore relationship to modern issues and current events, for example: (1) antiwar movements in different periods in United States history, (2) the influence of inventions and economic innovations, and (3) Indiana’s concurrent growth and development. Eighth grade students need to experience a variety of teaching and learning strategies. Students are provided practice in thinking and research skills by learning to use the media center, primary documents, and community resources to identify, evaluate and use appropriate data and reference information. Students develop an appreciation of historical preservation. Finally, students should demonstrate, through their studies, a commitment to the rights and responsibilities of citizenship in a democratic society.

The days learning targets are shared in the opening to set the stage for learning.  During the mini lesson, the teacher provides direct instruction to the whole class.  Work time is designed to allow the students to practice the learning.  The teacher confers with individual and small groups at this time to differentiate learning to ensure one year’s growth for each student.

 

8th Grade Science Workshop

Science workshop is designed with four basic parts: opening, mini-lesson, work time, and debriefing.  Students understand how atomic structure determines chemical properties and how atoms and molecules interact. They explain how the water cycle and air movement are caused by differential heating of air, land, and water and how these affect weather and climate. Students understand that natural and human events change the environmental conditions on the earth. They understand the predictability of characteristics being passed from parent to offspring and how a particular environment selects for traits that increase survival and reproduction by individuals bearing those traits.

The days learning targets are shared in the opening to set the stage for learning.  During the mini lesson, the teacher provides direct instruction to the whole class.  Work time is designed to allow the students to practice the learning.  The teacher confers with individual and small groups at this time to differentiate learning to ensure one year’s growth for each student.

 

8th Grade Math Workshop

Math Workshop is designed with four basic parts: opening, mini-lesson, work time, and debriefing.  Students develop an understanding of irrational numbers; connect ratio and proportional reasoning to lines and linear functions; define, evaluate, compare, and model with functions; build understanding of congruence and similarity; understand and apply the Pythagorean Theorem; and extend their understanding of statistics and probability by investigating patterns of association in bivariate data.

The days learning targets are shared in the opening to set the stage for learning.  During the mini lesson, the teacher provides direct instruction to the whole class.  Work time is designed to allow the students to practice the learning.  The teacher confers with individual and small groups at this time to differentiate learning to ensure one or more years growth for each student.

 

Algebra I

Algebra I formalizes and extends the mathematics students learned in the middle grades. Algebra I is made up of 5 strands: Real Numbers and Expressions; Functions; Linear Equations, Inequalities, and Functions; Systems of Equations and Inequalities; Quadratic and Exponential Equations and Functions; and Data Analysis and Statistics. The critical areas deepen and extend understanding of linear and exponential relationships by contrasting them with each other and by applying linear models to data that exhibit a linear trend, and students engage in methods for analyzing, solving, and using quadratic functions.

• Credits: A high school two credit course, one credit per semester

 

Geometry

Geometry formalizes and extends students’ geometric experiences from the middle grades. Students explore more complex geometric situations and deepen their explanations of geometric relationships, moving towards formal mathematical arguments. Five critical areas comprise the Geometry course: Logic and Proofs; Points, Lines, Angles, and Planes; Triangles; Quadrilaterals and Other Polygons; Circles; Transformations; and Three-dimensional Solids. The Process Standards for Mathematics apply throughout each course and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations.

• Recommended Prerequisite: Algebra I

• Credits: A high school two credit course, one credit per semester